Tame Your TOT™ — Terrible Office Tyrant

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Author of Conflict Resolution Book on Toddler and Boss Parallels Shares Needed Tips for Washington Negotiations

Sandbox Politics Can Be Overcome, Says Author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant (TOT); How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job

SANTA MONICA, CA, October 10, 2013 – Anyone cringing at the latest Washington wrangling is probably thinking, “Can’t we all just get along?”

Lynn Taylor, author and national workplace expert, is one of those people, and sees parallel behaviors between toddlers and authority figures - including those on Capitol Hill. She refers to them as “TOTs” or Terrible Office Tyrants, and says that every mortal is capable of this during stress or frustration.

“The difference is that when a toddler is stubborn, bullying, demanding, whiny, territorial, lying or throws tantrums – parents can intervene and there’s usually no potential for a global meltdown,” says Taylor. She adds, “The core human and childlike behavior affecting powerful adults in and out of the office has never been more evident and far-reaching as it is during the current crisis.”

Taylor remains hopeful, however, and summarizes tips from 12 of her 20 behavioral chapters, Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant (TOT); How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons). She challenges the opponents to examine practical tips that will inspire a win-win as they try to find common ground. Her behavioral chapters bear a striking resemblance to Washington warmongering, Taylor says. She asks rhetorically, “Do these toddler traits look familiar?”

  1. Stubbornness
  2. Territorialism
  3. Tantrums
  4. Bullying
  5. Ignoring
  6. Demanding
  7. Whining
  8. Self-centeredness
  9. Fantasy World
  10. Lying
  11. Endless questioning
  12. Fickleness

Tips for TOTs (a.k.a. Powerful Leaders)

1. Set the Stage for a Win-Win. Stubbornness can be mitigated, whether with a small child or a high-powered American politician, by realizing that whether two or 52, no one wants to lose face. Diplomacy can only happen if both sides realize that they can both appear winners. Arguing over who really set up the negotiation meeting, for example, is the antithesis of this mindset. “There is usually no winner unless both sides decide to win together,” Taylor says.

2. Offer Many Choices. “Whether you’re exasperated with a Terrible Two toddler or a political dignitary ready to throw a tantrum, you cannot start off with ‘It’s my way or the highway,’” says Taylor. The more options you put on the table, the better the chances of getting resolve. And that also means being open to new, real-time options during negotiations.

3. Choose Your Words Carefully. A war of words never helped solve a battle. No matter your age, you want to be heard intently. Your response should be devoid of emotion and not drift, e.g., “I appreciate and respect your view. I’d like you to consider a compromise on that particular point that could benefit both sides,” is a lot more palatable and productive than, “That is not possible; we’d rather chew glass than capitulate on that!” Taylor says to watch for words like “you,” “I,” “should or shouldn’t” and avoid accusatory tones: “How you package your argument can trump the disagreement itself.”

4. Pick Your Battles. Just as you can’t instantly and completely reform an out-of-control, frustrated tot, you must be clear on your hierarchy of needs. Know what you realistically believe could be an acceptable outcome. “You wouldn’t tell Johnny, ‘there’s no way you’re getting that cookie unless you eat your string beans. Oh, and by the way, put away your toys right NOW, or no more play dates!’” Taylor explains.

5. Use “C.A.L.M.” Taylor, whose website shows a strikingly parallel toddler-in-suits video, says that during any difficult negotiation, this acronym is a powerful antidote:

Communicate. Do it honestly, openly and frequently;
Anticipate. Go into the conversation with an understanding of the hot buttons and how to mitigate them;
Levity. This is one of the best tension breakers, and while no one is expecting a bi-partisan joke-a-thon, laughter can open a path for better dialogue. Example: “My 10-year- old son read a headline yesterday and asked, ‘Daddy, why not bring everyone cupcakes?’” – and lastly:
Manage. Take the high road, give the “opponent” a chance to respond, remember Aretha Franklin’s famed song, RESPECT, be a role model, stay calm and use positive and very diplomatic negative reinforcement. Example: “I value your very flexible approach on that point; does anyone want to comment before I chime in?”

“Threats, outbursts and competitiveness can be rampant whether you try to break up a tot sandbox brawl, or watch a political speech. But a little humanity and humility can go a long way for both sides - and in this case, the entire planet,” Taylor concludes.

For more information, visit: www.tameyourtot.com.

Contact:
Lynn Taylor
Lynn Taylor Consulting
1-800-454-0083

 

Hope Exists for Grads Despite Unemployment Spike, Says Workplace Expert, Author

SANTA MONICA, Calif., June 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- With degrees in hand, college grads are launching their post-graduate job hunt during a time of protracted national unemployment, which has risen to 9.1 percent for May 2011. So how do freshly minted grads find a job to love and stand out above the competition? One workplace expert says that graduates can be proactive and take steps to counter high unemployment.

“This summer is not the time to kick back and think for weeks about your career aspirations. While it’s wise to be strategic and take a short break, use this time to advance your career and build invaluable references,” says workplace expert Lynn Taylor, author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant (John Wiley).

"Employers want to know that you'll be dedicated on the job, and will ask you in so many words, 'what you did over your summer vacation.' Remember that it's not uncommon to parlay a summer job — including a part-time one, into a long-term, satisfying position once fall arrives," she says.

Taylor, CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting, adds that too often, not enough effort is put forth towards researching the prospective employer. "You can also spend some time on LinkedIn and industry websites finding out about the hiring manager. "That may create some common bonds and further demonstrate your interest in working at the company," Taylor says.

"During the interview, make sure you spend ample time interviewing directly with the person to whom you'll be reporting — to avoid working for what I call "terrible office tyrants, or TOTs. Assuming the job will advance your career 'on paper,' chemistry is critical, and so are your instincts about the cultural fit," says Taylor.

TIMELY TIPS

CONTACT: 
Lynn Taylor Consulting
1-800-454-0083

 

Is Your Time Off From Work Marred By “Vacation Guilt Syndrome?”

Handy Gift Book Advises How to Handle a Needy Boss with “Separation Anxiety”

SANTA MONICA, CA. Dec. 7, 2010 - If your holiday vacation is tainted with tiny tantrums from a needy boss, you may want to consider some career changing cheer and helpful advice with a book gift – for yourself and others.  

“Fear is a big driver, and when bosses - and kids- don’t have control, such as with matters of a vacation from work, a “terrible office tyrant” or “TOT” can emerge,” says Lynn Taylor. “The inner child should, but doesn’t ‘stay there’,” says the author of “Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant,” (John Wiley & Sons).

Taylor, a nationally recognized workplace expert, explains that despite this relatively quiet time of year, many bosses can become needy, like toddlers who have trouble modulating their authority. “Senior management can’t afford to take chances in this economic environment, and want to ensure there’s a tether to…you.”

In Taylor’s book, she offers tips on “separation anxiety” in offices that appear to be more of a schoolyard running amok than a professional company. “A needy boss wants constant assurance that you will take care of all needs and deadlines, holiday or not. Some ‘TOTs’ at the helm may be taking shorter vacations themselves, particularly at smaller companies, which can exacerbate the sense that you’re abandoning ship,” she adds.

If your boss suffers from holiday separation anxiety, then follow these tips from her book for a worry-free holiday, says the CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting:
 

“Neediness may seem benign at first,” says Taylor, “but it can quickly cascade into one of 19 other bad boss behaviors,” she outlines in Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant, which offers the ‘”what, why, tips and anecdotes” of the most common childish office traits. They range from tantrums and bullying, to stubbornness, demanding, moodiness, fickle, whining and others.

Book facts: Publisher: John Wiley; July 2009; Hardcover; $21.95 ISBN-13: 978-0470457641
Bio: Lynn Taylor is a nationally recognized workplace expert and author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™; How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons). Her book addresses how to manage childish and difficult boss and employee behavior. Through Lynn Taylor Consulting, she provides research-based, lively seminars for a more productive management team and workforce. Her site: www.tameyourtot.com.

Contact:
Lynn Taylor Consulting
1-800-454-0083


Survey Finds Employees Spend 19 Hours A Week Worrying About Boss Behavior

Workplace Expert, Author, Provides Career Tips for 2010 and Beyond

Santa Monica, CA, January 13, 2010 — According to a new survey released today by national workplace expert Lynn Taylor, author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant –TOT (John Wiley & Sons), U.S. employees spend 19.2 hours a week (13 hours during the work week and 6.2 hours on the weekend) worrying about “what a boss says or does.”

The national study was conducted by an independent global research firm and commissioned by Taylor’s firm, Lynn Taylor Consulting, which offers workshops on how to humanize the workplace for increased productivity and profitability.

Taylor said, “The study illustrates the tremendous drain that a manager’s words and actions can have on the minds and work product of its most valued asset – people – at a time when companies can least afford the loss. Particularly during this period of high unemployment, bad boss behavior can go into overdrive – distracting employees from the work at hand.”

“Conversely, the survey suggests that greater interpersonal sensitivity can significantly boost morale and help a company thrive,” Taylor said. She advises managers to go the extra mile by showing interest in the team’s well-being. “Employees’ careers are not on hold, even if major corporate initiatives are,” she added. Taylor said that spillover anxiety on weekends of 3.1 hours a day further underscores how critical the boss/employee dynamic truly is.

“Employees should take the initiative in 2010 to build their own human relations skills,” Taylor said. She added, “Tackle issues early on with diplomacy and deploy good ‘parenting skills’ in the office – without patronizing. Use positive and negative reinforcement; provide positive role modeling; humor; and set limits to unreasonable demands with tact, showing the benefits of an alternative compromise.”

The U.S. study was based on telephone interviews conducted with 1,000 respondents 18 years of age or older. For more information, visit www.LynnTaylorConsulting.com and www.TameYourTOT.com or call 1-800-454-0083.

About Lynn Taylor Consulting
Lynn Taylor is the founder of Lynn Taylor Consulting, which advises companies on how to humanize the workplace. A nationally recognized workplace expert, dynamic speaker and acclaimed author, Taylor is the author of the book, Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™(TOT); How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons, July 2009).


HOLIDAY OFFICE TALES FOR THE
BAD BOSS BLUES

National Survey Reveals Stories of Grinches, Ice Queens and Tiny TOTs

Santa Monica, CA, December 2, 2009 — If you’ve been working for a Grinch, Ice Queen or a “Tiny TOT” boss during the past tumultuous year, there is hope – or at least holiday cheer of the commiseration kind. 

In a recent national survey commissioned by Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert, respondents shared boss anecdotes that were more reminiscent of amped-up tots in toyland than professionals at work. Says Taylor, “The study’s anecdotes are proof positive that when it comes to the office, ‘the child within’ should stay there.”

Taylor, author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ (TOT): How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley), is CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting (LTC), which coaches CEOs on boosting morale and profits – that is, mitigating “TOT” (Terrible Office Tyrant) behavior that hurts productivity. The global firm that conducted the survey collected over 1,000 boss stories, some of which follow:

Tantrum Throwing

Taylor says that toddlers and “Terrible Office Tyrants,” whether bosses, co-workers or team members, both throw tantrums because they all have trouble modulating their power. She offers some solace, however: “If there’s something in it for your boss, you can usually effect change.”

Taylor suggests using C.A.L.M. when managers slip into TOT moments:

Communicate – Bravely and frequently reach out to your boss – and be aware of your TOT’s preferred communication method, e.g., e-mails, voice mails, meetings or texts.

Anticipate – Know your timing, and bring solutions to meetings, not problems.

Laugh – Use levity to break down barriers and forge bonds, even with seeming adversaries.

Manage – Assume a “parental” role without patronizing, use proactive problem solving and positive role modeling, but always set limits to bad behavior. If matters are egregious or escalate, take more serious action.

Self-Centered   

A related survey commissioned by Lynn Taylor Consulting found that bad, childish boss behaviors have increased over a five-year period, with self-centeredness moving to the top. The good news, according to Taylor, is that these traits can be defused by understanding their causes and by being proactive.

Needy

 
“Keep in mind,” Taylor says, “that a needy TOT can have an overwhelming feeling of neglect, but this can be a good time to get your projects approved.”

Taylor’s holiday tip: if your boss is a TOT or Scrooge don’t allow your holidays to be hijacked. According to Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant (TOT), you can learn to manage your manager, while you humanize your workplace. You’ll have a healthier start to 2010 – and others will thank you for it.

Watch YouTube for additional childish boss stories.

Lynn Taylor (Southern California) is a nationally recognized workplace expert and author of the newly released book, Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ (TOT): How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons). Taylor is a regular online contributor to national business and psychology publications. As the CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting, she provides seminars on building a more productive, profitable management team and workforce. For more information, visit TameYourTOT.com, Lynn Taylor Consulting or their blogs - or call 1-800-454-0083.


Lynn Taylor Consulting
1-800-454-0083



BAD BOSS BEHAVIORS RISE UP TO 50%;
SAYS FIVE-YEAR COMPARATIVE STUDY

Seven in 10 Americans Believe Bosses & Toddlers with Too Much Power Act Alike

SANTA MONICA, Calif. – October 7, 2009 – Report cards are out, and bad bosses are not getting very good marks, suggests a new five-year comparative study.

National surveys were conducted in 2004 and repeated in 2009 on bad and childish boss behavior, monitoring such traits as self-oriented, impulsiveness and stubbornness, and reveal increases of up to 50 percent over that period. Traits also shuffled, with “Self-oriented” moving to the top spot, far outpacing its earlier contender, “Stubborn.”

The comparative study was commissioned by author and workplace expert, Lynn Taylor, CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting, and was conducted by an independent global research firm. “In stressful times, such as a recession or a frenzied work pace, childish, bad boss behaviors are exacerbated,” said Taylor. The 2004 study and other extensive research encouraged Taylor to write her newly released book, Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ (TOT); How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons, July 2009). The book offers tips and anecdotes on “parenting” unruly managers who resemble tots in their Terrible Twos, and advises CEOs on how to “humanize their workplace.”

Trait Analysis

The trait analysis portion of the study compared toddler and boss behavior from 2004 to 2009 among 345 white-collar workers. The following chart shows “Self-oriented” catapulting to the lead in 2009, swapping places with “Stubborn” in 2004. “Overly demanding” and “Interruptive” also spiked over the five-year period.

Boss Traits Ranked by Most Cited

2004

   

2009

   

Stubborn

 

41%

Self-oriented

60%

Self-oriented

40%

Stubborn

 

49%

Overly demanding

36%

Overly demanding

43%

Impulsive, spontaneous,
acting on sudden urges

 

29%

Interruptive

39%

Interruptive

26%

Impulsive

 

41%

Throwing tantrums

19%

Throwing tantrums

19%

“Most employees endure the antics and sandbox politics when bosses let their ‘inner child’ run wild and wreak havoc. But this book shows readers how they can take back control in their careers and thrive even when faced with disruptive ‘TOT’ behaviors,” Taylor says. “A what’s-in-it for-us mindset must trump a what’s-in-it for-me mentality among bosses and throughout the organization,” she added.

Taylor views the “taming” of bad bosses as a shared responsibility and consults with organizations on building more productive, collaborative work environments.

The following chart shows traits ranked by percentage increases between 2004 and 2009.

Traits Ranked by Largest Percentage Increases

TRAITS

2004

2009

Percentage Increase

Self-oriented

40%

60%

50%

Interruptive

26%

39%

50%

Impulsive, spontaneous,
acting on sudden urges

29%

41%

41%

Stubborn

41%

49%

20%

Overly demanding

36%

43%

19%

Throwing tantrums

19%

19%

No change

Findings Among Larger Group (1005 Respondents)

Age, Gender Differences

The good news is, according to Taylor, that childish behaviors can be defused by understanding the causes of bad boss behavior and taking proactive steps for change.

“Employees can use empowering, time-honored humanistic techniques to remain focused and achieve positive outcomes in their work life,” she said.

Traits to Watch For & Employee Tips

Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ (TOT) lists 20 of the most common frustrating boss behaviors, divided into two major categories: “Bratty” and “Little Lost Lambs.” The first group includes: Stubborn, Demanding, Impulsive, Whining and others. The second group, representing less egregious traits, but nonetheless distracting and irritating, includes: Neediness, Short Attention Spans, Fickle and Endless Questioning.

Taylor believes that employees and management together can help mitigate “TOTs” running amok in the workplace. “Employees can use positive and negative reinforcement to effect change. You can always leave a job, but these skills are worth developing – and they’re transferable should you inherit a TOT of another variety,” she said. Taylor recommends C.A.L.M. as the best approach for creating a TOT-free environment:

Finally, Taylor reminds employees not to be patronizing, but that the humor in her message is designed to empower all those surrounded by childish, bad boss behavior. “Whether unruly or subversive, these behaviors are counterproductive to everyone, and hurt profits,” she said.

Taylor also believes that workers must be reminded that this is their career. “It’s helpful to deftly model good behavior to poorly skilled managers. Employees have invaluable skills – they own the proverbial cookie jar when they manage up,” she says.

About Lynn Taylor 

Lynn Taylor is a nationally recognized workplace expert and author of the newly released Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ - TOT (John Wiley & Sons, July 20, 2009). She is also the CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting, where she provides research-based, seminars to organizations on how to establish a more productive management team and workforce. For more information, visit Lynn Taylor Consulting.com, TameYourTOT.com, or call 1-800-454-0083.


STUDY SUGGESTS MANY BAD BOSSES ARE BEING BAILED OUT, TOO

New Survey Says 86 Percent of Americans See Parallels Between Poorly Performing Bosses Staying Under Radar and Bailed Out, Failed Firms

SANTA MONICA, Calif. – April 14, 2009 – Recent headlines of corporate misdeeds, poor performance and bailouts may be just the tip of the iceberg of a widespread lack of confidence in bosses, suggests a new national study. Eighty-six percent of U.S. adults feel that highly visible corporate calamities are similar to the much less conspicuous – but more far-reaching, ill-advised daily actions of managers that go unnoticed until it is too late.

“Bosses are expected to be accountable in any economy, but against the backdrop of a downturn and lean workforce, there seems to be less tolerance for poor decision making,” said Lynn Taylor, an expert on workplace issues and CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting. Taylor’s management consulting firm commissioned the national telephone survey of 1,002 adults, conducted by a global independent research firm.

“An ounce of accountability seems to be worth a pound of cure today, not only for high profile corporations, but also for bosses everywhere,” noted Taylor, author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ (TOT); How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons, July 2009). The survey question and results follow:

How much do you agree or disagree with the following statement? The actions of companies making headlines recently for misdeeds, poor performance or bailouts remind me of bosses whose poor decisions go unnoticed until it's too late - and by then too many people are affected. The response:

Always
86%
Disagree 
13%
Don't Know
1%

The widest discrepancies in sentiment were seen according to income and gender. For example, 92 percent of workers earning an annual income of $35,000 - $50,000 agreed with the survey question, in contrast to 79 percent of respondents earning $100,000 and higher. By gender, 91 percent of women agreed with the survey statement, versus 80 percent of men.

Taylor outlined some of the ramifications possible when bosses’ misjudgments remain unexposed:

As an advisor to companies on fostering a more motivated workforce, Taylor suggests that bosses adopt several strategies to strengthen confidence and trust among their staff:

Earlier Survey Underscores Mistrust, Job Jitters

A related study released in March 2009 by Lynn Taylor Consulting showed that employees spend almost three hours a day (2.8) worrying about their job fate – and that 76 percent of them become fearful when suddenly encountering a boss’s closed door. When asked how often they think this barrier signals lay-offs, respondents said:

Always
11%
Often 
32%
Sometimes
33%
Rarely  
15%
Never/Don’t Know
9%
 
_____
100%

“Both surveys point to the greater value being placed on bosses who can engender trust and be more accountable leaders,” said Taylor.

About Lynn Taylor
Lynn Taylor is a nationally recognized expert on employment issues and the CEO of Lynn Taylor Consulting, a management consulting firm that advises employers and employees on how to increase productivity through a more collaborative workplace. She conducts lively, research-based seminars on motivational topics such as how to “humanize your workplace™.” Taylor is the author of the forthcoming book, Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ (TOT); How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons, July 2009). For more information, visit www.LynnTaylorConsulting.com and www.TameYourTOT.com, or call: 1-800-454-0083.




NEW SURVEY REVEALS EMPLOYEES SPEND NEARLY THREE HOURS A DAY WORRYING ABOUT JOB SECURITY

76 Percent of Employees Get Jitters When Seeing Closed Boss’s Doors

Santa Monica, Calif. – March 4, 2009 - Employees across the country consume nearly three hours a day worrying about their job security according to a new national survey by Lynn Taylor Consulting, a firm that helps companies transform managers into more productive, trustworthy leaders through lively, research-based seminars. Bosses may be unwittingly fueling this fear by one simple action, staying behind closed doors, as 76 percent of employees say that when faced with this scenario unexpectedly, it triggers thoughts of being laid off.

“In today’s economic environment, employees are searching for every clue to determine their job fate. Too often, not enough direct input is given to employees, and so non-verbal cues are heavily relied upon,” said Lynn Taylor, a nationally renowned expert and author on workplace issues. “Managers working behind closed doors may be shutting out more than noise – they may be shutting down productivity,” she added.

Commissioned by Lynn Taylor Consulting, the U.S. study was based on telephone interviews conducted with 1,000 respondents 18 years of age or older by a national independent research firm.  The survey found that the average employee spends 2.8 hours (168.8 minutes) a day worrying about personal job concerns, such as company lay-offs and/or losing his or her job. 

The survey also underscores how deep-seated these suspicions are. When asked how often they think a boss’s closed door signals lay-offs, respondents said:

Always
11%
Often 
32%
Sometimes
33%
Rarely  
15%
Never/Don’t Know
9%
 
_____
100%

“Changes in manager behavior, such as a closed door, more private conferences, or less direct communication all represent potential ‘exit signs’ to many employees,” said Taylor, author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant (TOT): How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons, July 2009).

Taylor added that while managers have to deal with more sensitive personnel issues today than in previous decades, they can counter employee concerns at a critical time with more proactive communication.

“Acknowledging the astounding impact a small gesture can have on corporate productivity in tense times is a good first step. Providing your team with reassurances whenever possible will mitigate unnecessary panic and help them stay focused,” Taylor said.

“Many employees may also avoid speaking up to their bosses for fear of being shown the door, when, in fact, their ideas might boost a company’s bottom line at a time when that is sorely needed,” she said.

Underscoring this, added Taylor, is an earlier related study Lynn Taylor Consulting commissioned which revealed that 70 percent of 575 adult working professionals believe employees must be careful when “managing up” in their boss interactions, or they could risk losing their jobs.  "Managing up" was described as “proactively finding solutions to problems, consistently using good communications skills and modeling positive behavior to a boss.”

“Opening your door literally and figuratively might not only mean greater profitability. In some cases, it might also help keep the doors of your business open,” Taylor concluded. 

About Lynn Taylor Consulting
Lynn Taylor is the founder of Lynn Taylor Consulting, a management consulting firm that advises companies on how to humanize the workplace. A nationally recognized expert, dynamic speaker and successful author, Taylor counsels executives on motivational, management and employment issues. She has been quoted extensively in the media and is the author of the forthcoming book, Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant™ (TOT); How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job (John Wiley & Sons, July 2009).  For more information, visit www.LynnTaylorConsulting.com and www.TameYourTOT.com, or call: 1-800-454-0083.

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